headerlogo
EN/JP
menubutton
Clothes Swapping Party
2020.3.9 | Namita Kurokawa

Last Sunday, we hosted a Clothes Swapping Party at Nami Yoga Studio! It was a huge success to say the least. 

 

As a studio, we started being a bit more conscious about the environment and sustainability around the end of last year. We switched from paper towels to cloth towels to wipe down the mats. We introduced a water server at our studio to eliminate one time use of pet bottle waste. These actions heightened the awareness in both the students and the teachers. We were tremendously awed by the amount of waste we reduced in the course of a few months, and it was very visible! 

 

As part of our sustainability work, Hiko (our most remarkable Sound Bath Master) suggested a clothes swapping party. She is currently on a resolution to not purchase any clothing this year. With her idea and the work of many of our teachers, we were able to host our first clothes swapping party.

 

It was our first clothes swapping party, and also true for most of the students who participated! We had no idea what to expect! And as yogis say, “have no expectation.” This turned out really well! Lots of people brought in clothes, and majority of the people took home clothes!

By doing clothes swapping, we found many benefits!

 

 

Aparigraha – Practice non-attachment

How many clothes do you have in your wardrobe that you don’t wear anymore, but still hanging there just in case? Aparigraha teaches us that we actually don’t need that new shirt that looks exactly like the other shirt hanging at home. By participating in the clothes swapping party, everyone had a good look at their own wardrobe and gave them a change to practice aparigraha! Clean wardrobe, clean start! On top of all that, it’s much easier let go of items when you know that it may end up in another person’s wardrobe to have another life.

 

Free Clothes

At a clothes swapping party, there’s no price tag and there’s no budget. You’re more willing to try on items that you’ll never consider when you’re out shopping. Sequenced dress? Sure, why not. Skinny leather pants? Ok, let’s give it a try. Block colored puffer jacket? Yeah! If it’s free, take it home and give it a shot. If it doesn’t work, just bring it to the next clothes swapping party, and there’s nothing lost.

 

Freedom!

At a clothes swapping party, size doesn’t matter. There are more than just clothes. There are shoes, bags, accessories, men’s clothes, etc. You’re going to find items that suit you. On Sunday, there was a white coat/jacket that everyone had an eye on. It was extremely simple and chic. We all tried it on, and it was fun to see how one piece of clothing fits everyone very differently!! We had a mini fashion show, and countless compliments flying through the room. I can’t explain how much positive energy there was that day!!

 

What you don’t claim will go to a local recycling organization

Approximately one million tons of used textile products go to waste every year in Japan, of which 70% end up in landfills!! We found this fabulous organization called BRING, where they recycle used clothing to bioethanol and other products that can be used for sustainable energy.

 

Feedback from our students and friends

Please host this event again! Can we do it in the summer again?

Love the yoga clothes

There are so many clothes of such good quality

There are so many men’s clothes and I love them!

I got to mingle with different people from different industries

Thank you so much for hosting the clothes swapping

 

We’d like to thank all of you that participated in the clothes swapping party, and yes, we will definitely host this again. We hope that this event brought more awareness to simple things you can do in your community to live a more sustainable life. Let me also add, that these little things we do will save the world.

 

SHOW MORE
Yoga 101 “What is Yoga?”
2019.12.5 | Yumi Tanaka

Shad Darshana

In India, there are 6 classical philosophical systems called Shad Darshana. Shad means six and Darshana means Philosophy. Yoga is one of the philosophical systems and has been formulated by the founder, Patanjali.

Other philosophies include:

ーNYAYA / VAISHESHIKA

ーSAMKYA / YOGA

ーMIMMAMSA / VEDANTA

(These words were originally written in Sanskrit, thus the spelling may differ depending on the interpreter.)

 

Yoga Sutra

One of the scriptures of yoga is Yoga Sutra. It was compiled prior to 400CE by Patanjali.

The word Sutra translates to “thread” and each section of the sutra is tersely formulated. There are 4 chapters (or Padas) and 195 aphorisms (or Sutras). Each chapter has a theme and each aphorism is written in line with the various themes that gives us life hints, goals, realizations, precautions in a very simplified yet precise manner. The original texts were written in Sanskrit and have been translated into languages from all over the world. It is an essential guide book for those studying yoga.

 

In our Yoga101 Workshop, we are going to introduce a famous Sutra from the book.

 

Yoga is a Reminder

When I started practicing yoga, I thought I wanted to be better, I wanted to change, but in a vague manner. I didn’t know where to start. Neither did I have a specific plan. I ended up not doing much.

 

Once I started practicing yoga, and what I mean by this is not just the physical movements, but studying the philosophy, my view towards yoga completely changed.

 

It no longer became a hobby or an after-work lesson. It became a lifestyle. The way I perceived my thoughts, actions, and all aspects of my life started to change.

 

For example, why do we eat?

Is it to make us full? Or to satisfy our taste buds?

I realized that through my yoga studies, we eat because it directly becomes our energy source.

It sounds very simple and obvious, but bringing me back to the basics was what yoga taught me.

 

“How do we view the world?” is a big theme in the Darshanas I mentioned earlier.
This means to have a healthy mind and body, to be humane, and to enjoy life.

 

Why Yoga 101?

Through our Yoga 101 workshop, we want everyone to have and value their own practice. We want everyone to realize that moving the body is just one subject of the big picture. That there’s more to yoga. That is why we decided to share this workshop with everyone.

 

In the present-day society, we always seek for answers. It’s so easy to search about the yoga philosophies on google. However, reading it doesn’t become knowledge.

 

Do you remember the first time you rode a bike? Your parent or family or friend probably explained to you the steps and tips. Then boom! You were able to ride it! It probably wasn’t that easy. You rode it multiple times, falling over, and getting up again and again and again. You brushed up your skills over time through practice.

 

Yoga is just like riding a bike.

You learn the concept, and you put it into practice.

 

You probably read or heard all the benefits of yoga. However, the biggest benefit is to practice it yourself and feel it for yourself. Only then, you will be able to call it yours.

 

Don’t get me wrong, I’m still in the middle of my journey.

 

Whether it be self-care, lifestyle, or wellness, there’s different angles you can try to tackle yoga.

 

Dec 8, 2010 from 14:30-16:00

Excited to meet you all on the mat for the Yoga101 Workshop!

SHOW MORE
Hakuba Yoga Retreat Reflection 2019
2019.10.18 | Namita Kurokawa

Last month, September 2019, we hosted our first Yoga Retreat ever. Our main goal was for the students to incorporate yoga into their lifestyle on a more regular basis. And by “yoga” I don’t just mean the asanas, but all aspects of “yoga” including breathing, meditation, and philosophy.  

 

We usually perceive yoga as a physical exercise. The meaning of the word “Asana” is not known, even amongst people who seem to be practicing yoga on a regular basis. Asana is a Sanskrit word that literally means “seat.” Many people would say that it means “yoga pose,” right? And it’s not wrong. Originally, it was said that the only posture in yoga necessary was a comfortable seated position. Through time, the perception of asanas changed, but the ultimate purpose of comfortable seated posture for meditation hasn’t changed. 

 

Although we didn’t want to stress people out with the technicality, we did want people to experience yoga as a lifestyle. Through this concept, we introduced kriya and pranayama techniques as well as various asana practices. We also conducted a cooking class on making ayurvedic brownies!! It actually turned out really well, and reminded me of India (where I actually ate it for the first time). We definitely didn’t forget to have fun!!

 

Ok, first of all, what do all these terms mean?!

 

Kriya

In our yoga practice, we address Kriya as cleansing techniques. The purpose of performing the various cleansing techniques are to remove impurities and toxins in our body and to prepare ourselves for pranayama, and move the vital energy to the central sushumna (energy) channel, to attain moksha (or liberation).  

 

There are 6 cleansing techniques in yoga, also known as Shatkriyas. “Shat” means six and “Kriya” means cleansing, 

  1. Neti: Nose cleansing
  2. Dhauti: Digestive tract cleansing
  3. Nauli: abdominal massage cleansing
  4. Basti: colonic irrigation cleansing 
  5. Kapalabhati: Skull Cleaning
  6. Trataka: Eye Cleansing

 

During our yoga retreat (and also during our monthly Kriya Cleansing Workshops), we preform Neti, Nauli, Kapalabhati, and Trataka. 

 

Pranayama

“Prana” means breath or vital energy in the body. “Yama” means to control. There are so many types of Pranayama, but that can be for another blog! I want to point out that Breathing = Life. The reason I say this is because 

humans can go…

without food for 40 days,

without sleep for 11 days,

without water for 3-4 days,

but can only go without air for few seconds ~ few minutes!! (This depends on your lung capacity). 

 

Asana

A lot of people say “Yoga” when they actually mean “Asana.” As mentioned before, asana literally means “seat.” In the past, it was said that the seated position was the only asana needed to sit comfortably to meditate. In ancient text, it illustrates 84 asanas. Now, there are hundreds, possibly thousands of asanas including variations with crazy long Sanskrit names like Parivrtta Prasarita Padottanasana!

 

Ayurveda

In Sanskrit, “Ayus” means life, “Veda” means knowledge. Ayurvedia is a medical science of ancient India incorporating diet, herbal remedies, exercise, meditation, breathing and physical therapy. Ayurveda and yoga are closely interconnected in terms of techniques used and the overall wellbeing of oneself. There are three types of Doshas which are Veta, Pitta and Kapha. Depending on which category you are, the diet differs and the treatments differ. I just want to point out that ayurvedic diet doesn’t necessarily mean vegan. 

 

Going Forward…

The concept of Yoga Retreat in Japan is relatively new. In a culture where taking days off of work is an unspoken taboo, where more hours of work means better reputation, where taking detours in life is seen as unsuccessful (TRUST ME, I’ve been there, done that) we want to slowly introduce the view that it’s ok to take time off for yourself and your wellbeing. We are starting to see a shift in trend and hope that more people view themselves as a priority going forward. 

 

Our Next Yoga Retreat is coming up soon! Will keep you posted!

 

Founder and Yoga Instructor at Nami Yoga Studio.
SHOW MORE
Yoga Changed My Life
2019.7.3 | Tsubaki

June 21st was International Yoga Day. 

International Yoga Day was proposed by the Prime Minister of India, Narendra Modi, in 2015 and was declared by the United Nations to raise awareness of yoga and health to the world.

 

Yoga was practiced worldwide on this day for the mind and body as well as for the wellness of the society. 

 

As for myself, I participated in Lululemon’s event. The theme was “Yoga Changed My Life” where we practiced yoga for 60 minutes. It was an excellent opportunity to reflect back on the words, people, experiences that changed my life. 

 

I was introduced to yoga on my first year as a new grad. My life was work after work and was devastated with the thought of it. I guess I was overwhelmed with the work environment and couldn’t think of anything else. One day, I found a yoga studio near my train station and jumped in. I loved moving around as a child and yoga sounded like an excellent option. Oh, how I LOVED savasana in that first class I joined. It seemed like I basically went to class for that (lol). Even now, Savasana is one of my favorites! 

 

Yoga seemed to always normalize the chaotic feelings and anxiety that I had. My family even says, “you’ve changed since you started yoga.” I’ll leave it up to you to imagine how emotional I got before I started yoga. lol

 

The depth of change is not the focus. Coming onto your mat and quietly breathing will also bring change. “It’s a little easier to breath,” you may say, and that small change makes a big difference. 

 

Let’s try to practice connecting the mind to the body. 

 

I’m thankful for being introduced to yoga. Namaste.

After graduating from university, she started her career experiencing various professions in PR, Media, and IT.
As she became passionate about the effect of yoga both on the body and soul, she decided to deepen her understanding through teacher training at UTL. She began to provide her own yoga training as an instructor to help people discover an overall sense of well-being.
SHOW MORE
OM
2018.10.14 | Namita Kurokawa

OM and my childhood My father always chanted OM in the sauna. When I was little, he would tell me to chant with him. It felt funny and weird at the same time. It was a surreal scene where my father was sitting in sukasana with gyan mudra, sweating from his head and chanting OM continuously. I sometimes chanted with him. But most times, I was just listening because I didn’t understand what it meant or why we were chanting in the first place. He never explained the meaning of this chant. All he said was, “Just try it, it’s good for you.” Or something along those lines.

  After many years, I started practicing yoga. In class, we would chant OM, and it came so naturally to me while others in class felt reluctant to chant. The whole sound and vibration actually felt good. It made me calm and refreshed. Then, it reminded me of my father in the sauna and I finally understood what he meant by “Just try it.”     OM is the entire alphabet Om is broken down into three sounds. “A”, “U”, and “M”. The A-U makes the O sound. Thus, shortened to OM.   A (Ahhh) is the first letter of the Sanskrit alphabet; the waking state. U (Ohhh) is the middle letter of the Sanskirt alphabet; the dreaming state. M (Mmm) is the last letter of the Sanskirt alphabet; the dreamless state. Silence is the last part of the AUM chant. It is the vibration which is beyond verbal pronunciation. It is said to be the pure consciousness of the self.   “A” is an open sound with open lips resonating at the front of the mouth, “U” moving midway, and “M” ending at the back of the throat with the vibration traveling throughout the head. Lead by silence, contemplating on the vibration. By chanting OM or AUM, we vocalize all the sounds the voice can produce (meaning everything in the Sanskrit alphabet), representing the universal consciousness.     What does OM mean? OM has a lot of meanings. It is usually defined to replicate the sound of the universe. It is said that even on NASA’s website, earth itself sounds like OM. As mentioned above, the three sounds “A”, “U”, “M” in itself have meanings. It is the waking state, dreaming state and the dreamless state. It can also mean the past, present and the future. It can also represent the Hindu gods Brahma (creator god), Vishnu (sustainer god), and Shiva (destroyer god).   From the Mandukya Upanishad, “OM is the imperishable word. OM is the universe, and this is the exposition of OM. The past, the present, and the future, all that was, all that is, all that will be is OM. Likewise, all else that may exist beyond the bounds of time, that too is OM.” So, basically, it’s deep, and it’s everything.     Now What? Reading this blog is not going to do much. You now have to experience OM yourself. Chant “AhhhOhhhMmmm” followed by silence to notice the vibration, and repeat it 3 times. You will notice calmness, stillness and quietness within.   I understand now that my father was experiencing this in his safe space, the sauna. His saying, “Just try it” really makes sense now. I believe the true benefit of OM comes from personal experience, just like practicing yoga.   And recently, I starting making it a night time routine for my kids to practice 5 yoga asanas and to chant OM before and after these poses. Today, one of my daughters had a breakdown during the day so I told her, “Breath in. Breath out. Wanna do OM?” and without any hesitation, she said, “Yes.” I was happy that my kids are experiencing this benefit at an early age.

Manager and yoga instructor at Nami Yoga Studio.
SHOW MORE
To Be Stress-Free
2018.9.16 | Rinan

What stresses you out?

Relationships? Work-life?

 

You have probably encountered different types of stress: physical Stress, phycological stress, emotional stress, behavioral stress, to mention a few.

 

We have to deal with stress coming from all angles.

 

That being said, there are good stress and bad stress. Good stress usually comes when you’re trying to achieve a goal, and works as a stimulus to achieve that goal. Bad stress is when you face stressors that take a heavy toll and feel inescapable. Stress all depends on how you feel and interpret it.

 

It’ll be amazing if all stress can be good stress, but there are ways to switch your mentality to interpret bad stress as good.

 

There are four steps to go about this.

  1. Notice what is causing the stress.
  2. Don’t let it accumulate.
  3. Make it a habit to always look on the bright side.
  4. Practice to forgive yourself.

 

It’s easier said than done. This is going to take a lot of practice, and through yoga we can exercise these four steps. Yoga not only stimulates the physical, but also the mental.

 

We tend to desire a stress-free life and look outward to hope that our environment changes. Let’s say that the environment did change for this particular stressful problem and you feel less stressed. It’s good, but it didn’t target the fundamental problem. If another undesirable event occurs, you will most likely feel stressed again. Ultimately, we would have to work within ourselves. It all depends on how you perceive the situation. If we have foggy glasses, we’ll always see things unclear. If we have clean glasses, we will be able to capture the truth. Let’s aim to have clear glasses (or heart) together through practice.

 

Starting this month on Fridays, we have a class called Restorative Stretch. Restorative means to repair or renovate to its original condition. In other words, we want to bring our balance back from a chronic stressful state. Join us for a relaxation class.

 

Started classic ballet at age 3, gymnastics at age 7 and studied performing arts at university for 4 years. Yoga was first introduced to Rinan as a beauty method, but after practicing Jivamukti Yoga, she came to realize the importance of asanas with the combination of philosophy. Countless hints of happiness are hidden behind the philosophy of yoga. If we can bring the yoga practice off the mat and spread the love and peace, we would be living in a wonderful world!
SHOW MORE
Jivamukti Yoga FOTM 2018 Aug

H2OM

patraṁ  puṣpaṁ  phalaṁ   toyaṁ  yo  me  bhaktyā  prayacchati  tad ahaṁ bhakty-upahṛtam  aśnāmi  prayatātmanaḥ

 

Whatever is offered to Me with a pure loving heart, no matter if it is as small as a leaf, a flower, a piece of fruit, or sip of water, I will accept it from one who’s mind is restrained.

BG IX.26d

 

I turned the faucet and filled a small glass with water just as I had daily for a month. The water was still brown, not brownish like weak tea, but thick and brown, like a puddle of water on the ground when it is disturbed. Today, Cape Town’s reservoir is almost empty, California has its usual drought, and the crisis of drinking water is hitting home. At our home in Woodstock, we have our own water well and I have taken the clear, untreated water for granted for many years. Panic stricken—with the vision of the heat system and water tanks filling with mud, I wondered: Will Krishna accept my offering of mud?

 

This verse from Bhagavad Gita says that the substance of the offering is less important than the sincerity with which it is offered, but I can’t help but wonder, if by “sip” of water, drinkable is implied. I rushed to the grocery store to buy big plastic containers of “spring” water. They cost 3 dollars each, and I wondered if that was just the cost of the fancy plastic container with built-in handle and spout, or if it is the cost of the water inside. Many of the cities that we have visited to teach yoga over the years are threatened with imminent drinking water shortages: Bangalore, Beijing, Cairo, Moscow, Istanbul, Mexico City, London, Tokyo, and Miami. In each of these places we were offered plastic bottles of “drinkable” water.

 

Each city has different stressors and it is not really possible to conceive of a universal cure. Surely, changing the underlying water usage patterns of human beings is called for. These patterns are deeply ingrained and propelled by a tendency to take clean water for granted, as we flush it down the toilet or run it from the tap. Although the Earth is 70% H2O, only 2.5% of it is drinkable, and only 1% is accessible. More than a billion people live without enough clean, safe water.

 

The use of water in animal agriculture is probably the single most profoundly wasteful use of water resources. It takes 1,800 gallons of water to produce a single pound of beef 1, compared to potatoes at 60 gallons, or wheat at 108 gallons per pound. But it is not just water usage that we need to look at in order to preserve safe drinking water. For the bulk of human history we have regarded elements like water and air as inexhaustible and infinite, as well as always replenishing, free, and unpollutable. As we see our resources dwindling or spoiling, the door opens for the corrupt elite acquisition and privatization of the vital elements that are necessary to sustain life and that should be freely available to all.

 

A few years ago there appeared on New York City streets some amazing guerilla art posters depicting a popular brand of bottled water containing air rather than water. The point of the poster was that unless we safeguard our precious natural resources and protect them from privatization we will lose them in an ocean of plastic. In California, scarce water resources irrigate pomegranate and almond fields–exotic foods for a privileged class.

 

This is economic based scarcity. In sub-Saharan Africa, people’s true potential is lost gathering water and suffering water-born diseases, especially women and children. When many demonstrate on Wall Street for the re-distribution of the wealth of a hoarding, privileged 1%, how many of those demonstrators see themselves as the ones with unlimited access to 1% of the available clean drinking water? How many of them drink that water from expensive plastic bottles?

 

We travel to India often, and lately we have been traveling to China, and there are some interesting perspectives to be gained. For one thing, it is very apparent what happens when the human population grows beyond the carrying capacity of the Earth. All around us there are people eager to take from each other in order to survive another minute, day or week.

 

The Earth is running out of water that will support human existence. “Family living can be existing and everyone can come to be a dead one, and not anyone then, is remembering any such thing.” 2According to some Hindu scriptures, the Kali Yuga (the current age) will end in a fast and fiery way, wiping out all forms of life as we know it. It is our job as yogis to maintain the innate serenity of mind throughout, and to carry on with the righteous activities devoted to dharma. The destruction of this world is followed with the creation of a new one. The Satya Yuga (Golden Age), is followed by Treta Yuga (less virtuous, the advent of agriculture), then Dwapara Yuga (Tamasic, discontent, disease), then our present Kali Yuga (with some 427,000 years to go of liars, hypocrites, pollution, and scarce water). During Kali Yuga, rulers become unreasonable and no longer promote spirituality or protect their subjects; they become dangerous. People will migrate, seeking countries with water and food; people will have thoughts of avarice, wrath and murder; acquisition of material wealth, lust, addiction to food and drugs, treating living things as objects (animals, people) becomes the central facet of life. Only the lucky few will respect teachers and teachings.

 

The good news is that for the first 10,000 years of the Kali Yuga there will exist a Golden Age in which yoga practices will still be present on Earth. Today, 5,000 years of the Kali Yuga have passed and we have 5,000 years remaining where we will be blessed with the knowledge of the yoga traditions. We still have time to bring peace to this place, calming the muddy waters of distress.

 

Written by David Life
From Jivamukti yoga official site: https://jivamuktiyoga.com
SHOW MORE
Where Yoga Leads Us
2018.7.4 | Rinan

Where does yoga lead us?

Is your goal to raise your leg the highest? Or to hold inversions the longest? Or to be the most flexible or to build muscle? Or are you here to lose weight?

 

What are you trying to get out of yoga?

 

In my class, I occasionally say, “Don’t fight in the asana.”

 

Humans naturally have a huge ego and have a tendency to (maybe unconsciously) think “Iwant my pose to look the best in this class.”

 

This deeply rooted concept can be let go through practice of yoga.

 

Santosha

Within the eight limbs, there is Niyama which represent self-discipline that should be performed in your daily life. Further, one of the Niyamas is Santosha.

 

In sanskrit Santosha means ‘satisfaction’. Are you all satisfied? Us humans have a tendency to look towards things we don’t have.

 

Even celebrities who seem to ‘have it all’ are not necessarily always satisfied. Amongst them, some may feel miserable. We periodically see on the news that they get addicted to drugs or sadly commit suicide.

 

All humans have a difficult time maintaining the state of satisfaction.

 

For example, you see a beautiful dress or a gorgeous watch and you want to buy it. You decide to work hard, save money, and go buy these items. At first, you feel extremely happy that you possess these items and use them with great care.After a while, you walk past that store and see new items on display. You strongly feel the need to buy those as well.

 

This is probably something we’ve all experienced.

 

Through this example, you can see that humans are particularly terrible at keeping the state of satisfaction going.

 

Musk Deer Example

Here’sa story of a musk deer. One day, this deer smelled a lovely scent frome somewhere. So, he started searching for the smell. He walked and walked, but couldn’tdetect where the fragrance came from. Then, he realized that he himself was the root of the smell.

 

We usually get carried away with the fast moving environment and don’t have time to realize that the most important things are already with you and inside of you.

 

Through Yoga…

With our hatha yoga practice, it is possible to train our mind and body to be in a consistent state of satisfaction.

 

So, it’s ok if you pose is not perfect. First, place yourself in an environment to practice yoga. Feel grateful, and be satisfied. Although you may not have a perfect asana, pat yourself on the back for not running away from your practice and putting in the effort. Then, focus on your breathing and focus your attention to your mind and body.

 

Being a yoga instructor doesn’t liberate you from these desires. I still feel envious of others and of things I don’t possess. It’s important to continue your practice throughout your lifetime

 

As mentioned before, it’s difficult to always feel satisfied. I hope that through practice, the duration of satisfaction slowly multiplies. And don’t hesitate to take your practice off the mat!

Started classic ballet at age 3, gymnastics at age 7 and studied performing arts at university for 4 years. Yoga was first introduced to Rinan as a beauty method, but after practicing Jivamukti Yoga, she came to realize the importance of asanas with the combination of philosophy. Countless hints of happiness are hidden behind the philosophy of yoga. If we can bring the yoga practice off the mat and spread the love and peace, we would be living in a wonderful world!
SHOW MORE
Categories
・Cleansing・Environment・Inspiration・Jivamukti Yoga・Maternity Yoga・News・Philosophy・Recipe・Retreat・Training / Traveling
Tags
amaannouncementaroma therapyAsanaashtangachaichantingchest openercleansingcommunitydetoxeight limbsenergyenvironmentessential oilfive sensesfocus of the monthFOTMgoalsgratitudeherbindiajivamuktijuice cleansekriyalifestylematernity yogamorning yoganewsniyamanutrientsOmphilosophypostnatal yogapracticePranayamapregnancyrainy seasonrecipereflectionrestorative yogaRishikeshSantoshasmoothiespicespiritualstressstudent discountteaching in japantongue cleansingtravelworkshopYamaYoga Festivalyoga in japanYoga RetreatYoga101アーサナアーマアナウンスアロマインドエッセンシャルオイルクリヤゴールコミュニティサント―シャジヴァムクティヨガジュースクレンズストレススパイススムージーチャイチャンティングデトックスニヤマニュースハーブプラーナヤマヨガフェスタヨガリトリートリシケシュリストラティブヨガレシピワークショップ五感八支則呼吸法学割感謝朝ヨガ東京ヨガ栄養梅雨浄化法環境目標舌磨き